Spider Veins Specialist

Middle Georgia Vascular Surgery Center & Vein Solutions

Vascular Surgery located in Warner Robins, GA

Tiny veins that form spiderweb-like patterns on your skin usually aren’t a cause for alarm. However, they can be unsightly, and if you want to get rid of them, Allison Burkett, MD, FACS, of Middle Georgia Vascular Surgery Center & Vein Solutions in Warner Robins, Georgia, can help. Dr. Burkett uses cutting-edge sclerotherapy techniques like Varithena™ foam injections to destroy spider veins quickly and painlessly. For more details on this in-office procedure, call or book an appointment online today.

Spider Veins Q&A

What are spider veins?

Spider veins are tiny red, purple, or blue veins less than 1 millimeter in diameter that are visible on the surface of your skin. They're known as spider veins because they tend to form clusters that resemble a spiderweb.

The odd patch of spider veins usually indicates a localized problem in your skin. Underlying structural issues in the veins are unlikely, so it's not necessary to perform further diagnostic tests.

If you have spider veins, you don't need to worry that you have a limb-threatening condition, and treating them is a straightforward process.

​Can spider veins be more than a cosmetic problem?

Some patients find their spider veins cause problems such as:

  • Pain
  • Itching
  • Burning
  • Tenderness

You might develop extensive areas of spider veins and larger varicose veins as well, which could be a sign of vascular disease.

If your spider veins are symptomatic, or you also have varicose veins, Dr. Burkett might perform duplex ultrasound testing on your leg to see if there's any underlying vein disease.

How are spider veins treated?

If your spider veins aren't causing you any problems, you don't need to undergo treatment. However, if they're troublesome or you find their appearance distressing, Dr. Burkett can perform a procedure called sclerotherapy.

Sclerotherapy involves having an injection into the spider veins of a liquid or foam called a sclerosant. One of the products Dr. Burkett uses with great success is Varithena foam sclerosant, which contains polidocanol.

What does sclerotherapy for spider veins involve?

Injecting a sclerosant into the spider vein makes the vein walls collapse, forming a seal that stops blood from flowing down the treated veins. The blood that would have gone along the spider veins simply bypasses them and travels via a healthy vein nearby.

The treated veins shrivel up, and over time, your body breaks them down so they disappear, meaning you end up with blemish-free legs. While treated spider veins can't grow back, it's possible to develop new spider veins.

If you don't like the way your spider veins look or they're becoming a nuisance, call Middle Georgia Vascular Surgery Center & Vein Solutions today and schedule a consultation or book an appointment online.